Archive for the ‘Projects’ Category

Call for Participation: Hyphenated American

Call for Participation: Hyphenated American
Deadline: March 28

Last year’s Hyphenated American project, supported by an Idea Lab Mini-Grant, was a great success featuring visual art, poetry, new music compositions, and guest lecturers who came together for a show focused on Latinos in the U.S. This April, Hyphenated American is returning with a broader focus to amplify the voices of immigrants, refugees, and hyphenated Americans of every culture. If you are an ally, we want to hear from you too!

What are we looking for? Creative responses to the theme “Diversity enriches the U.S.” Submissions can be in any of the arts including dance, visual art, film, music, and poetry! As a Hyphenated American you have a unique voice and a unique message. Share it in a show that unites people in an increasingly divisive climate.

Send a sample or description of your project idea by March 28 to Monique Osorio: aosorio1@uga.edu

Oh and by the way, what is a hyphenated American? Well, you know.. Latin-American, Arab- American, Muslim-American, African-American, to name a few, but you get the idea.

Daylighting the Watersheds Design Competition

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Daylighting the Watersheds UGA Design Competition
Deadline: October 14
Two $1,000 prizes

Download application: watershed.uga.edu/daylighting.pdf
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Student teams are invited to participate in the Daylighting the Watersheds design competition to raise awareness about streams that flow through the UGA campus and to support the mission of Watershed UGA by creating a community ethic for the restoration of campus streams. Two projects will be selected to receive prizes of $1,000 each.

Each proposal should feature designs for a project to be installed in one of the following locations:

Tanyard Creek Watershed Site adjacent to Tate Center and Bolton Dining Commons near the intersection of Baxter Street and S. Lumpkin Street

Lilly Branch Watershed Site adjacent to Joe Frank Harris Commons and the Lamar Dodd School of Art near Carlton Street and River Road

Selection criteria:

Merit project raises awareness about campus watersheds

Innovation project features new ideas

Feasibility proposal materials consider costs, sustainability, and campus standards

Collaboration proposal materials reflect teamwork and interdisciplinary activity

Presentation proposal materials communicate effectively

Each project team must include at least two UGA students. Watershed UGA encourages teams with participants from more than one discipline or academic department, including students, faculty, staff, and members of the community. Multiple applications are permitted.

Since the founding of UGA in 1785, many natural features of campus watersheds have been steadily altered and relegated to obscurity. Tanyard Creek and Lilly Branch, both tributaries of the North Oconee River, are the most prominent streams that run through campus. Daylighting the Watersheds offers an opportunity to explore the history and significance of two streams that were once part of the daily lives of students, but now lack visibility and recreational benefit.

Watershed UGA facilitates the use of our campus as a living laboratory to advance sustainability and environmental stewardship through teaching, research, service, and university operations. The Daylighting the Watersheds design competition is generously supported by a grant from the Ray C. Anderson Foundation.

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ICE Project Featured in Hugh Hodgson School of Music Convocation

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Opening convocation ceremonies at the Hugh Hodgson School of Music included a live demonstration and performance of new technology developed with the support of ICE. An ensemble of twenty musicians conducted by UGA Director of Bands Dr. Cynthia Johnston Turner, along with the mobile phones of 250 audience members, performed a composition by DMA candidate Cody Brookshire.

Brookshire, in collaboration with Nicholas Saney (Computer Science, Linguistics), Richard Saney (Computer Science, Music), and Jake Reeves (Mathematics, Music) received a 2015-2016 mini-grant to develop technology that enables electronic devices to be synchronized, solving a major latency challenge of networked electo-acoustic performance.

Following the successful development and performance, the team is exploring ways to make the technology available to more artists. Visit synkrotakt.com for more information and a video demo.

Related story: ideasforcreativeexploration.com/?p=3612

Hyphenated American

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Hyphenated American: Latinos
Tuesday, April 26 at 7 PM
Georgia Museum of Art

Come learn about the struggle, perseverance, and cultures of Latinos through the arts and educational discussion. Topics of identity, different immigration statuses, educational injustice in Georgia, and more will all be covered. Art gallery, spoken word, and lots of live music with a reception to follow. Free to the public.

Hyphenated American Panel

Dr. Sergio Quesada, UGA LACSI professor: discussing why it is important for Latinos to maintain their cultural identity.

Heidy Guzman, MA in Professional Counseling: discussing some of the psychological impacts of immigrations.

Johanna Cochran, Associate Attorney with Kuck Immigration Partners: presenting on Policy 4.1.6 and on the difficult process to gaining legal status in the US.

Art and Performance

Anita Guevara – Spoken Word
Orlando Pimentel – Visual Art
Daniel Allen – Guest Composer
Monique Osorio – Guest Composer
Band: Laura Camacho (bass), Corey Flowers (guitar), John Phillips (percussion), and Monique Osorio (vocals)

Supported in part by an Idea Lab Mini Grant.

Another Kid’s Treasure Island

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Another Kid’s Treasure Island
Saturday, April 23 at 10 AM and 2 PM
State Botanical Garden of Georgia

Children’s Garden Theater in the Woods
Tickets; $5, free for kids 12 and under
Makerspace fun after the show!

Liza, Jack, and Avery Hinkley were lost on an abandoned island after a boating afternoon gone awry. Throughout their time on the island, the band used natural and found resources to build a life away from home. Join Mayor McMillian and the town of Franklin in hearing their story and awarding the siblings for their bravery, innovation, and work to change the community! After the performance, participants can create their own inventions with the UGA Children’s Theatre Troupe at different makerspace stations that will be filled with recyclable materials. Directed by Kelsey Brown and written by Ali Olhausen.

Supported by a Sustainability + Arts Grant sponsored by the UGA Office of Sustainability and Ideas for Creative Exploration (ICE).

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UGA student finds “Treasure” with sustainability grant

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March 13, 2016
Athens Banner-Herald
link to original article

UGA student finds “Treasure” with sustainability grant
By Kristen Morales

A shipwreck on an island could have been a disaster, but it worked out pretty well for University of Georgia College of Education junior Kelsey Brown.

That’s because the island is the backdrop for an original play by Brown, a communication sciences and disorders and theater major. The idea won her this year’s Sustainability + Arts award from the University of Georgia Office of Sustainability, and the $2,000 grant will allow her and other members of the UGA Children’s Theatre Troupe to produce “Another Kid’s Treasure Island.”

The play is distinct in that it combines the arts with science and engineering concepts, and its ticketed performances this spring will also feature an innovative extra: make-space stations where the audience can create new things from recycled items. The story follows the adventures of three siblings who set out on their boat but get shipwrecked on an island. While there, they meet up with another marooned child and begin inventing things to help with their rescue.

“One of the big things we wanted to do with this project was not only reach out to students, but also bring the sustainability aspect to other theater majors,” Brown said. “Many student-produced shows have very little funding, if any at all, so we can really benefit from thinking outside the box, repurposing and sharing items.”

The Children’s Theatre Troupe is one of Brown’s passions, and she said they have made an effort in recent years to push the boundaries of their shows. For example, a performance last fall for elementary students through the Experience UGA program used projections and digital graphics to help tell the story. With “Treasure Island,” Brown said they plan to take the show on the road for several performances, so the set needs to be portable. And because the students are used to being budget-conscious, using upcycled materials fits with the sustainability aesthetic.

In fact, the bulk of the sustainability grant will instead be used to set up the maker-spaces for the on-campus performances and provide take-home bags for families so they can tinker with their own set of curated recycled materials, such as lights, tape and “tinker cards” to play with at home, Brown said. “Plus books to read and ways you can be more sustainable at home,” she added. “So, we’re trying as much as possible to make it something worthwhile for families to come. We don’t want to just do it for our sake.”

A nugget of inspiration for the show came from a class Brown took with College of Education instructor Gretchen Thomas, who teaches a maker-space class open to all majors. This semester’s class is collaborating with Brown on the play to collect reusable materials and develop the makerspace stations for them.

Although, Thomas contends, Brown likely would have come up with the concept on her own; it was simply the class that helped her connect the idea to the term, “makerspace.” “Kelsey’s really good at seeing the ordinary and figuring out how to make it very different, which is really what making is all about,” Thomas said. “I never would have connected makerspaces and sustainability. And it’s a great way to get families to come out and tinker.”

“Another Kid’s Treasure Island” will be performed April 23 to 25 at the UGA Fine Arts Building, and special outdoor performances at 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. April 23 at the State Botanical Garden of Georgia. Tickets are $5 (cash only) for all performances; children younger than 12 are free. The troupe also plans a show at Scottish Rite Hospital in Atlanta and a few other locations around Athens.

Brown said the combination of theater and technology might seem strange, but it’s actually a perfect combination — and one that will please a larger audience. “So many of the concepts in theater are important in engineering, experimenting and even coding. That’s kind of what the original intent behind this collaboration was,” she said. “I’m sure there’s no sustainability or entrepreneurial guru saying, ‘No, we don’t want children to learn this.’ Teachers, engineers and professionals alike are always looking for an outlet to teach STEM skills to the next generation, and theater is the perfect medium.

“It doesn’t happen too often presently because we, as theater students and professionals, are just not experienced in those areas,” she added. “But I see a lot of pairing up in the future, especially in the science field, because theater is a great way to not only grab young people’s attention, but also educate.”