Archive for the ‘Press’ Category

2019 a2ru Student Challenge Grant Recipients Announced

May 1, 2019
a2ru
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2019 Student Challenge Grant Recipients Announced

Two interdisciplinary student teams were awarded Student Challenge Grants by the Alliance for the Arts in Research Universities (a2ru) to pursue projects that were inspired by the 2019 Emerging Creatives Student Summit hosted by James Madison University on the topic of Food + Place. The summit convened interdisciplinary teams from various a2ru partner research universities to address issues around the theme.

“Food Bites Infozine” was awarded $2,000 plus travel expenses to attend and present at the 2019 a2ru National Conference, to create a series of infozines, which cover an assortment of diverse aspects of food and place. Of the project, the group states: “Through these curated collections of stories, resources and works of art, we hope to offer ways to think about and consider the role food plays in our personal, communal, and environmental experiences and relationships. We intend to use these working understandings to explore the ties we feel to the places (physical & intangible, grounded & transient) that we occupy.” The team includes Laura Ney, University of Georgia, PhD., Crop and Soil Sciences; Irasema Quezada Hammock, University of Alabama at Birmingham, BFA, Graphic Design; Sarah Whittmeyer, University of Colorado, BS, Music and Music Business; Stephanie Bonnell, University of Cincinnati, major in Communications and minor in Environmental Studies; Sydney Mathis, University of Virginia, double major in Commerce and Global Environments and Sustainability; and Emma Kornegay, VCU School of the Arts, BS Fine Arts.

Indonesian Artist Made Bayak Weaves Cosmology with Sociopolitical Issues

March 27, 2019
Flagpole Magazine
By Jessica Smith
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Indonesian Artist Made Bayak Weaves Cosmology with Sociopolitical Issues

One of Bayak’s most complicated trajectories concerns the Indonesian genocide of 1965, which targeted accused communists and led to the establishment of the authoritarian New Order regime. Approximately 5 percent of the population of Bali was executed, paving the way for new investments and hyper-development to swarm in. For decades, systemic silencing surrounding the genocide has prevented public discourse, but today, a loose coalition of activists, including Bayak, are working to collect oral histories, locate mass graves and uncover the truth.

Jazz Duo Explores the Intersection of Math and Music

March 27, 2019
Flagpole Magazine
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Jazz Duo Explores the Intersection of Math and Music
By David R. Adler

In comparing math and jazz, Miller and Schneiderman don’t want to suggest a “scientific” approach to music. Quite the contrary: They emphasize the creativity, collaborative ethos and search for beauty inherent in mathematics.

Ad·verse Fest Features an Inclusive Lineup of Music, Drag, Art and More

February 27, 2019
Flagpole Magazine
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Ad·verse Fest Features an Inclusive Lineup of Music, Drag, Art and More
By Jessie Goodson
Photo credit: Savannah Cole

Ad·verse is designed to give artists who may be marginalized or othered a space and, in fact, an entire event dedicated to them. Featuring over 40 solo and duo acts, the lineup is full of musicians, visual artists, drag performers and more. Go Bar, the Caledonia Lounge and Flicker Theatre and Bar are the three participating venues, and all will have stages designed by artists with a variety of props, details and even projections. Performers will use the designs as inspiration, and some will work them into their show.

Carter describes the event as a festival designed by artists, for artists, and says their goal was to curate something that could hone in on that.

“It’s important to structure a festival around something that is less constricting in terms of identity—but still invested in identity—but structured around something else and, through its method, shows a new trend in performance,” Carter says.

Cristina Echezarreta: On Altruism, Art, and Science

Winter 2019
UGA Graduate
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Cristina Echezarreta: On Altruism, Art, and Science
By Cynthia Adams

Can prison inmates become creative collaborators? Idea Lab Mini Grant recipient and MFA student Cristina Echezarreta says, yes, they can.In the process of working with the Georgia Prison Beekeeping program, the graduate student has brought her twin interests, art and entomology, together.

Prior to the prison beekeeping project, Echezarreta later explains she wouldn’t have been so interested in doing a joint art project. Now, she has observed the value of social engagement, and seeks to be ever more inclusive and collaborative.

The Idea Lab Mini Grant Program is supported by Ideas for Creative Exploration, an interdisciplinary initiative for advanced research in the arts at UGA. Ideas for Creative Exploration is supported in part by the Willson Center for Humanities and Arts, Franklin College of Arts and Sciences, and the Graduate School.

Beekeeping Behind Bars

October 10, 2018
UGA Research
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Beekeeping Behind Bars
By Jordan Meaker

UGA Idea Lab Mini Grant recipient and Masters of Fine Arts student Cristina Echezarreta has been working in close conjunction with the Georgia Prison Beekeepers program and the UGA honeybee lab in order to explore the similarities of prison systems and bee systems.

Echezarreta had taken notice of the peculiar system of honeybee democracy. When honeybees want to leave their hive and scout out a new location, they share information with one another and come to a collective decision.

“It’s not just about the queen bee and she makes all the rules, it’s more so about the collective,” Echezarreta said.

Echezarreta took this idea and put it in practice within prisons.

“The way that relates in an artistic sense is how can we get individuals within prison systems to mimic that kind of behavior,” Echezarreta said. “How can inmates and just people work together to create one commonality, one project?”

Echezarreta takes photos at the prisons and helps gather supplies so inmates can create artwork together and paint hives, working together and helping each other, much like a colony of honeybees.

Through her work in Georgia prisons, Echezarreta said she enjoys the collaborative aspect of the project, which is a change from her solo projects.

“This is more of a different project, a more socially engaged project, a more collaborative project rather than me just being in my studio,” Echezarreta said.

Echezarreta said working with the Prison Beekeeping program has helped her learn to not stereotype and to see things from different perspectives.