Archive for the ‘Reading Room’ Category

Reading Room: Somewhere Becoming Rain: Adaptive Change is the Future of the Arts


A report reflecting on EmcArts’ experience of designing and implementing national Innovation Labs for the Arts over the last 10 years, with an essay by Steven Tepper (2013 ICE Visiting Scholar).

If the matching grant model of building nonprofits dedicated to presenting excellent professional art was the dominant policy frame for the 20th century, what will be the policy frame for the 21st century? While the arts ecology will continue to be diverse, representing many different styles of expression, modes of engagement, and forms of organization, an emerging set of practices and ideas are driving artists, funders and organizations who are keen to connect the arts more deeply with public life.

Source: EmcArts
emcarts.org/case_studies/somewhere-becoming-rain

Reading Room: Centre for the Less Good Idea

The South African artist William Kentridge has set up an arts foundation near his studio in Johannesburg, providing a “safe space for uncertainty, doubt, stupidity and, at times, failure”, he says. The artist has called his foundation the Centre for the Less Good Idea—a reference to the process of creation, which often sees artists derailed from exploring their initial idea and focusing on “secondary ideas that emerge during the process of making”, he says.

By Cristina Ruiz
Source: The Art Newspaper
theartnewspaper.com/news/news/kentridge-opens-space-for-artists-to-learn-by-failing/

Reading Room: Watch a dance performance change in real time with facial projection mapping

Watch a dance performance change in real time with facial projection mapping

the University of Tokyo designed a high-speed projector that projects 1,000 frames per second — what they say is the world’s fastest. By using the projector alongside a 3D-mapping system and precise sensor tracking, the video creators were able to change the look of the dancers and the aesthetics of the video in real time.

By Lizzie Plaugic
Source: The Verge
www.theverge.com/2017/4/1/15135962/inori-prayer-music-video-facial-projection-mapping-how

Reading Room: Civic Engagement

Reading Room: Civic Engagement: Why Cultural Institutions Must Lead the Way

arts and culture organizations must understand themselves not as arbiters of taste, but as creative homes for the people. They must be places driven by artists, culture bearers, philosophers, and activists. They must be platforms for cultivating public imagination; building thick and diverse networks; convening across differences and sectors; and incubating breakthrough ideas that stick, because they spring from communities that come together to embrace truth, honor diversity, and poetically pursue freedom.

By Deborah Cullinan
Source: Stanford Social Innovation Review
Link: ssir.org/articles/entry/civic_engagement_why_cultural_institutions_must_lead_the_way

Reading Room: Tech Start-Ups Have Become Conceptual Art

Reading Room: Tech Start-Ups Have Become Conceptual Art

The potential gutting of the NEA is worthy of concern and lamentation. But equally important, and no less disturbing, is the fact that the role of art, in part, had already shifted from the art world to the business world anyway. In particular, the formal boundary-pushing central to experimental and conceptual artists might have been superseded by the conceptual efforts of entrepreneurship.

By Ian Bogost
Link: www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2017/03/tech-startups-conceptual-art/519924/

Reading Room: Trump Proposes Eliminating the Arts and Humanities Endowments

A deep fear came to pass for many artists, museums, and cultural organizations nationwide early Thursday morning when President Trump, in his first federal budget plan, proposed eliminating the National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities.

President Trump also proposed scrapping the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, a key revenue source for PBS and National Public Radio stations, as well as the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars.

It was the first time a president has called for ending the endowments. They were created in 1965 when President Lyndon B. Johnson signed legislation declaring that any “advanced civilization” must fully value the arts, the humanities, and cultural activity.

By Sopan Deb
Link: www.nytimes.com/2017/03/15/arts/nea-neh-endowments-trump.html