Archive for the ‘Press’ Category

UGA research featured in a2ru publication “The Case for Arts Integration”

December 11, 2019
Willson Center for Humanities and Arts
link to original article

UGA research featured in a2ru publication “The Case for Arts Integration”

The Case for Arts Integration, produced by the Alliance for the Arts in Research Universities (a2ru), presents insights gathered from interviews with academic leaders, institutional officers, faculty, staff, and students at over 60 research universities. The publication features evidence of impacts, best practices, challenges, and exemplars of arts integration, including Applying Creative Inquiry to Enhance Imaginative and Collaborative Capacity in STEM, a new UGA project funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF).

The NSF Innovations in Graduate Education award supports a three-year project led by an interdisciplinary team of researchers from the arts, humanities, and sciences at UGA. The award will bring together a diverse group of graduate students from STEM and arts disciplines to address environmental issues using creativity-based training methods from the arts. If successful, widespread adoption of these methods will contribute to equipping STEM graduates across the country with communication and collaboration skills and ultimately increase creative and innovative solutions to complex global environmental challenges.

The project team formed through a series of activities developed by Ideas for Creative Exploration, an interdisciplinary initiative for advanced research in the arts at UGA, in partnership with the Willson Center, the Graduate School, the Center for Integrative Conservation Research, the Office of Sustainability, and Watershed UGA. Encouraged by the success of a 2017 pilot program, the team was further motivated by the publication of a report by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine in collaboration with a2ru, The Integration of the Humanities and Arts with Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine in Higher Education: Branches from the Same Tree.

a2ru facilitated a series of town hall meetings across the country to share the report’s findings and recommendation for “funders to take leadership in supporting integration by prioritizing and dedicating funding for novel, experimental, and expanded efforts to integrate the arts, humanities, and STEMM disciplines and the evaluation of such efforts.” The UGA project will be among the first in the nation to share data about the effectiveness of arts integration with STEM graduate training that is supported by rigorous quantitative and qualitative assessment methods.

Inclusion in The Case for Arts Integration is a further sign of UGA’s emergence as a nexus for arts and environmental research after hosting the 2018 a2ru national conference Arts Environments. The NSF award and forthcoming study assures continued prominence for UGA as an a2ru partner institution and contributor to innovation in arts research.

Project team:

Nathan Nibbelink (Center for Integrative Conservation Research/Forestry)

Lizzie King (Center for Integrative Conservation Research/Ecology/Forestry)

Mark Callahan (Ideas for Creative Exploration/Art)

Kathryn Roulston (Education)

Brian Haas (Psychology)

Chris Cuomo (Philosophy/Women’s Studies)

Laurie Fowler (Watershed UGA/Ecology)

Rebecca Gose (Dance)

Jenna Jambeck (Engineering)

Michael Marshall (Art)

Meredith Welch-Devine (Graduate School/Anthropology)

Ground Works: Exploring Research as Craft

Fall 2019
Ground Works Special Inaugural Edition
Link: a2ru2019.groundworks.io/gallery

Exploring Research as Craft (ERAC) collaboratively engages seemingly disparate disciplines through craft, material meaning-making, and critical response. Across the sciences and arts, people engage with their material and social environments to craft meaning about the world. However, academic siloing and the prioritization of jargon over communication endorse narrow understandings of science, art, research, and craft. Developed by an anthropology PhD student and an MFA at the University of Georgia (UGA), ERAC is a three-part workshop series to promote cross-disciplinary communication by conceptualizing research and practice as craft. This series culminated in a public exhibition at ATHICA, a non-profit gallery in Athens, Georgia. ERAC uncovers commonalities in how students, researchers, and faculty from diverse disciplines engage with questions about the world. In this way, traditional disciplines are deconstructed and research itself is promoted as an expression of cultural values and individual experience.

Exploring Research as Craft is supported in part by an Idea Lab Mini Grant.

UGA students featured in national arts research conference

October 29, 2019
Willson Center for Humanities and Arts
link to original article

UGA students featured in national arts research conference

One year after UGA hosted the Alliance for the Arts in Research Universities (a2ru) national conference, students and faculty from Athens will travel to the University of Kansas for the 2019 annual gathering of leaders. The November 7-9 event will feature discussions, white papers, posters, exhibitions, performances, and workshops around the theme of Knowledges: Artistic Practice as Method. Among the presentations selected through a rigorous peer review process is Exploring Research as Craft, a UGA student-led project developed with the support of the Willson Center’s partnership with Ideas for Creative Exploration, an interdisciplinary initiative for advanced research in the arts at UGA.

Project leaders Cydney Seigerman (Integrative Conservation and Anthropology) and Alden DiCamillo (Lamar Dodd School of Art) initiated their research through the Idea Lab Mini Grant program, a collaborative seed grant opportunity that pairs project teams with funding and mentorship from Ideas for Creative Exploration. Seigerman and DiCamillo worked with Alex McClay (Lamar Dodd School of Art), a graduate assistant in Interdisciplinary Arts Research, to facilitate production of an innovative three-part workshop series designed to promote cross-disciplinary communication by conceptualizing research and practice as craft. Workshop participants included graduate students from art, anthropology, ecology, English, forestry, microbiology, and landscape architecture. In spring 2019 the Exploring Research as Craft workshop outcomes were featured in a public exhibition and performance co-sponsored by ATHICA: Athens Institute for Contemporary Art.

Presenting research at the national level is an incomparable professional and networking experience for graduate students at UGA. For Siegerman and DiCamillo, it is the culmination of a process that began with an inquiry about the connections of methods across seemingly disparate disciplines. Siegerman reflects that “my experience in lab – the rituals of setting up experiments, of measuring out starting materials with my favorite spatula, and the attention I paid to the process and beauty of my experiments is often forgotten in the final analysis of data.” The workshop series combined aspects of communication, feedback, and creative activities that led to a deeper understanding and appreciation of the craft of research. DiCamillo discovered “that interdisciplinary work that stems from the arts is filled with radical, energetic people and communities who know how to stretch and work ideas so that they become dynamic realities.”

Alex McClay has a unique perspective of Exploring Research as Craft from her dual role of project facilitator and participant. She recalls, “working with researchers from a variety of disciplines, all while offering feedback, production support, and visual knowledge, was the most impactful part of this experience.” As a graduate assistant in Interdisciplinary Arts Research, McClay is part of an elite group of students in art, music, and theatre and film studies who are recruited to work with Ideas for Creative Exploration as peer mentors and leaders. They gain practical experience by organizing the seed grant selection process, managing project budgets, and helping projects reach their full potential.

UGA is a partner in the a2ru network, a consortium of institutions aligned to promote interdisciplinary research, curricula, programs, and creative practice between the arts, sciences and other disciplines. As an additional benefit of membership, students are eligible to apply for travel grants from a2ru to support participation in the national conference and the upcoming 2020 Emerging Creatives Student Summit RISE UP! Community – Connection – Collective Memory hosted by the University of Cincinnati.

2019 a2ru Student Challenge Grant Recipients Announced

May 1, 2019
a2ru
link to original article

2019 Student Challenge Grant Recipients Announced

Two interdisciplinary student teams were awarded Student Challenge Grants by the Alliance for the Arts in Research Universities (a2ru) to pursue projects that were inspired by the 2019 Emerging Creatives Student Summit hosted by James Madison University on the topic of Food + Place. The summit convened interdisciplinary teams from various a2ru partner research universities to address issues around the theme.

“Food Bites Infozine” was awarded $2,000 plus travel expenses to attend and present at the 2019 a2ru National Conference, to create a series of infozines, which cover an assortment of diverse aspects of food and place. Of the project, the group states: “Through these curated collections of stories, resources and works of art, we hope to offer ways to think about and consider the role food plays in our personal, communal, and environmental experiences and relationships. We intend to use these working understandings to explore the ties we feel to the places (physical & intangible, grounded & transient) that we occupy.” The team includes Laura Ney, University of Georgia, PhD., Crop and Soil Sciences; Irasema Quezada Hammock, University of Alabama at Birmingham, BFA, Graphic Design; Sarah Whittmeyer, University of Colorado, BS, Music and Music Business; Stephanie Bonnell, University of Cincinnati, major in Communications and minor in Environmental Studies; Sydney Mathis, University of Virginia, double major in Commerce and Global Environments and Sustainability; and Emma Kornegay, VCU School of the Arts, BS Fine Arts.

Indonesian Artist Made Bayak Weaves Cosmology with Sociopolitical Issues

March 27, 2019
Flagpole Magazine
By Jessica Smith
link to original article

Indonesian Artist Made Bayak Weaves Cosmology with Sociopolitical Issues

One of Bayak’s most complicated trajectories concerns the Indonesian genocide of 1965, which targeted accused communists and led to the establishment of the authoritarian New Order regime. Approximately 5 percent of the population of Bali was executed, paving the way for new investments and hyper-development to swarm in. For decades, systemic silencing surrounding the genocide has prevented public discourse, but today, a loose coalition of activists, including Bayak, are working to collect oral histories, locate mass graves and uncover the truth.

Jazz Duo Explores the Intersection of Math and Music

March 27, 2019
Flagpole Magazine
link to original article

Jazz Duo Explores the Intersection of Math and Music
By David R. Adler

In comparing math and jazz, Miller and Schneiderman don’t want to suggest a “scientific” approach to music. Quite the contrary: They emphasize the creativity, collaborative ethos and search for beauty inherent in mathematics.